hours of service

Canada - Hours-of-Service Regulations

Canada’s new truck driver hours-of-service (HOS) rule became effective on effective on Jan. 1, 2007. According to the Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA), the core of the rule is that the daily off-duty time for drivers is no less than 10 hours.

The rule is consistent with the expectations of CTA, Canada’s trucking lobbying group, which had worked closely with Transport Canada, the agency that issued the rules.

Highlights of the new rule include:

  • when splitting off-duty time, solo drivers without sleeper berths must have an off-duty period of at least 8 consecutive hours off-duty time, with the remaining two hours allowed to be split into no less than half-hour increments
  • when splitting off-duty time, team drivers with sleeper berths may split their off-duty time into two 4-hour periods, with the remaining two hours allowed to be split into no less than half-hour increments
  • when splitting off-duty time, solo drivers with sleeper berths may split their off-duty time into two periods, with no single period being less than 2 hours
  • maximum of 13 hours/day driving time, 14 hours/day on-duty time
  • no more than 16 hours may elapse between 8 consecutive hours of off-duty times
  • no less than 10 hours/day off-duty time
  • in a 14-day cycle, a driver may accumulate no more than 120 hours on-duty time, or 70 hours on-duty time without taking at least 24 consecutive hours of off-duty time 
  • in a 7-day cycle, a driver may be on-duty no more than 70 hours 
  • a 7-day cycle may be reset after at least 36 consecutive hours of off-duty time, while a 14-cycle may be reset after at least 72 hours.

 

United States - Hours-of-Service Regulations

NOTE: A new Hours-of-Service (HOS) Proposed Rulemaking was published on December 29, 2010. For details, visit the HOS Proposed Rule page to view the complete rulemaking, summary of changes, FAQs, and other related information.

The Hours-of-Service regulations (49 CFR Part 395) put limits in place for when and how long commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers may drive. These regulations are based on an exhaustive scientific review and are designed to ensure truck drivers get the necessary rest to perform safe operations. FMCSA also reviewed existing fatigue research and worked with organizations like the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies and the National Institute for Occupational Safety in setting these HOS rules.

The regulations are designed to continue the downward trend in truck fatalities and maintain motor carrier operational efficiencies. Although the HOS regulations are found in Part 395 of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations, many States have identical or similar regulations for intrastate traffic.

Who must comply with the Hours-of-Service Regulations?

Most drivers must follow the HOS Regulations if they drive a commercial motor vehicle, or CMV.

In general, a CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business and is involved in interstate commerce and fits any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • A vehicle that is involved in Interstate or intrastate commerce and is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards is also considered a CMV.

 

HOS Reference Materials

  • Interstate Truck Driver's Guide to HOSNew!
  • Interstate Passenger Carrying Driver's Guide To Hours of ServiceNew!
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Logbook Examples [PDF]
  • HOS Final Rule
  • [Federal Register Notice PDF] Recordkeeping Forms

 

Summary of the Hours-of-Service Regulations

The following table summarizes the HOS regulations for property-carrying and passenger-carrying CMV drivers.

 

HOURS-OF-SERVICE RULES

Property-Carrying CMV Drivers Passenger-Carrying CMV Drivers

11-Hour Driving Limit

May drive a maximum of 11 hours after 10 consecutive hours off duty.

10-Hour Driving Limit

May drive a maximum of 10 hours after 8 consecutive hours off duty.

14-Hour Limit

May not drive beyond the 14th consecutive hour after coming on duty, following 10 consecutive hours off duty. Off-duty time does not extend the 14-hour period.

15-Hour On-Duty Limit

May not drive after having been on duty for 15 hours, following 8 consecutive hours off duty. Off-duty time is not included in the 15-hour period.

60/70-Hour On-Duty Limit

May not drive after 60/70 hours on duty in 7/8 consecutive days. A driver may restart a 7/8 consecutive day period after taking 34 or more consecutive hours off duty.

60/70-Hour On-Duty Limit

May not drive after 60/70 hours on duty in 7/8 consecutive days.

Sleeper Berth Provision

Drivers using the sleeper berth provision must take at least 8 consecutive hours in the sleeper berth, plus a separate 2 consecutive hours either in the sleeper berth, off duty, or any combination of the two.

Sleeper Berth Provision

Drivers using a sleeper berth must take at least 8 hours in the sleeper berth, and may split the sleeper-berth time into two periods provided neither is less than 2 hours.

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